History

BEGINNINGS

Under the Church Extension programme of our mother Church, St Andrew’s, its Session saw the urgency of planting a new congregation in the east. Hatfield was then furthest east and the site on the corner of Hilda and Schoeman Streets was purchased.

In July 1922, Sunday School started in the carpenter’s shop of Messrs. Davidson and Junor in Prospect Street, Hatfield (the firm appointed as builders).

On 20 June 1923, the two foundation stones of the building, which is now our Founders Hall, were laid.  Building was completed in November 1923 at a cost of Three Thousand Three Hundred Pounds.

For the next 5 years, the hall was used for Sunday School in the mornings and divine service in the evenings – still functioning as a preaching station with different ministers and lay preachers taking the services. However, the need for a settled minister was seen to be inevitable and so it was resolved to raise Hatfield to the status of a full charge, opening the way to call a minister. In March 1929 a call was addressed to the Rev Peter Gordon who accepted and was inducted on 15th May 1929. For the first year, he acted as Session Clerk as well, until Mr G Leighton was elected in May 1930.

During the Rev Phillips’ time (our 4th minister) the new church building was built. Its foundation stone was laid by him in March 1959. St Columba’s flourished – reaching a membership of 727 in 1993.

Our Wall and Garden of Remembrance was completed in December 1983 and its dedication took place in January 1984.

PRAISE BE TO OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST

Today St Columba’s is still at home in Hatfield. We have a family morning service at 09:30, with a Sunday School running at the same time. It is a traditional church, founded on the word of God with a strong reformed doctrinal ethos. We believe that the Church is a place for questioners, doubters, seekers, the wounded and broken, sore of heart, weary in spirit, and people in need of God’s healing. We believe the church is a place to experience the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ. It is a place of mission.

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